Building and Sustaining Social Digital Scholarship: RSA Virtual Round-table Session

Presented at the Renaissance Society of America Conference, Boston, 1 April 2016
URL: http://commons.itercommunity.org/rsa-round-table-april-2016

Ray Siemens, Alyssa Arbuckle, Lindsey Seatter, Randa El-Khatib, Shawn DeWolfe, Matthew Hiebert, William Bowen, Tim Sobie, and the Iter Community Research Group, reflecting the RSA Virtual Roundtable consisting of presentations also by Jason Boyd, Constance Crompton, Matthew Davis, Laura Estill, Diane Jakacki, and Daniel Powell

1. Bill Bowen (U Toronto), “History and Evolution of Iter.”

link: History and Evolution of Iter


2. Ray Siemens (U Victoria), “Praxis/Research in Facilitating the Work of an Academic Community.”

link: Praxis/Research in Facilitating the Work of an Academic Community.


3. Alyssa Arbuckle (U Victoria), “Community Engagement For A Collaborative Digital Initiative.”

link: Community Engagement For A Collaborative Digital Initiative.


4. Matthew Davis (NCSU), “Inclusive, Public-Facing Publishing.”

link: Inclusive, Public-Facing Publishing.


5. Laura Estill (Texas A&M), “Early Modern Studies after the Digital Turn + Database of Dramatic Extracts.”

link: Early Modern Studies after the Digital Turn + Database of Dramatic Extracts.


6. Diane Jakacki (Bucknell U), “What is a Social Edition?”

link: What is a Social Edition?


7. Constance Crompton (UBC-O), “Social Edition of the Devonshire Manuscript.”

link: Social Edition of the Devonshire Manuscript.


8. Jason Boyd (Ryerson U), “Social Life and Early English Performance Records.”

link: Social Life and Early English Performance Records.


9. Daniel Powell (Kings College London), “The Renaissance Knowledge Network in Context: Aggregating Digital Resources and Tools for Early Modern Studies.”

link: The Renaissance Knowledge Network in Context: Aggregating Digital Resources and Tools for Early Modern Studies.


10. Shawn DeWolfe (U Victoria), “How to use Iter Commons.”

link: How to use Iter Commons.


About the RSA

The Renaissance Society of America (RSA) is the largest international learned society devoted to the study of the era 1300-1700. Founded in 1954, RSA has grown to include over 5,000 members around the world. One quarter of them are outside North America. RSA’s members can be found especially at universities and other institutions of higher education as faculty, graduate students, and postgraduate students, as well as at museums, libraries, and cultural institutions; members also include independent scholars and many others interested in Renaissance studies. Members identify with one or more disciplinary groups. The number of these groups has grown over the years, reflecting the field’s vibrancy and diversity. They are Americas, Art and Architecture, Book History, Classical Tradition, Comparative Literature, Digital Humanities, Emblems, English Literature, French Literature, Germanic Literature, Hebraica, Hispanic Literature, History, Humanism, Islamic World, Italian Literature, Legal and Political Thought, Medicine and Science, Music, Neo-Latin Literature, Performing Arts and Theater, Philosophy, Religion, Rhetoric, Women and Gender. RSA also recognizes some ninety associate organizations, which range from other learned societies, to research centers, to university seminars.

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